As we embarked on our new design, Antonym, we did not intend to create a type that could be easily grasped or placed, but rather something more elusive. It is an eclectic hybrid that defies easy classification. Partly a serif with asymmetrical wide thin slabs, partly a modulated sans, one of its defining features is missing serifs where one expects them: on curved letters, letters with horizontal strokes, and letters with a curved stroke. Others peculiarities include an a with an overhanging top stroke, a single-story g with a serif on top, narrowed M and a flattened diagonal stroke of the S with apertures so small it approaches an 8.

These highly idiosyncratic details coexist with predictable sturdiness of a 19th-century-inspired slab serif, including wide proportions and low contrast, high x-height and short descenders. The unlikely alloy of styles feels fitting for the melting pot that is contemporary culture and is well-appointed for those cutting-edge projects where distinction is required. Antonym’s predisposition to thoughtful bespoke use does not preclude a more pedestrian application. It is unexpectedly attractive when used for text, as well as display setting, and can be economical when used for closely-leaded text at minuscule point sizes without appearing dense. We made a point of limiting the family to two weights, light and regular; their italics are forthcoming.

Designed by Gayaneh Bagdasaryan and Vyacheslav Kirilenko, 2019